Archive for the 'General Autism Information' Category

DNA testing to determine if remains are those of autistic teen Avonte …

Avonte Oquendo

Avonte Oquendo

New York – The search for 14 year old Avonte Oquendo who was last seen on October 4, 2013 may be over.  DNA results from remains recovered last Thursday are expected to be determined around Wednesday, January 22.

After authorities were led to  the shores of the East River, they retrieved several body parts and clothes that resembled those Avonte was wearing when he went missing. The search continued over the weekend and almost all of the remaining parts of the same body have been collected.

According  to published reports Avonte’s mother, Vanessa Fontaine has been asked to submit DNA samples to the medical examiner’s office on Friday, as well as a toothbrush and a birth certificate with his baby footprint.

The negligence suit was to be filed today in State Supreme Court in Queens. David Perecman, the Oquendo family’s authority has stated that he will wait until  the medical examiner’s office identifies the remains are those of Avonte. Results are expected to be confirmed sometime mid week.

The New York daily News quotes Perecman, as saying,

“Unfortunately, there is good reasons to think it’s him.”

Previous reports by Autism Daily Newscast on the unfolding of this case can be found here.

Other News of Interest:

Autism Research Review – June 2013

Families Seeking Medical Marijuana Move to Colorado

Carly Fleischmann taking social media by storm

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A walk to remember with a special brother

By | The Inbox – 

Carlo Deogracias

By Isaiah Maru C. Deogracias, VERA Files

I am no special kid, but I joined the Angels’ Walk for Autism again last Sunday as I do every year.

It’s the18th year of kicking off the Autism Awareness Week with a walk with angels around the mall. But today was a treat to special children and their families as we were seated in the newest ultimate world class entertainment and sports venue, the SM Mall of Asia Arena. Among the most expensive dance concert held here was that of Jennifer Lopez, the kind that may not have a space for special children.

When I stepped in The Arena for the first time, I begin to imagine my favorite bands in a concert there, what a joy it could be. And I saw up close that joy in my brother in the songs and dances we both watched in celebrating the 25th anniversary of the Autism Society of the Philippines there.​

So what am I doing in this event and every year before this that I’d wake up early just to be here? It’s for my brother. This means a lot to him.

Older than me, my Kuya Giancarlo Miguel has autism. We’ve been together since birth, and since then I’ve learned to accept and love him for who he is. My mother always entrusted me with the responsibility of caring for him when they are no longer able to. As such, I’ve learned to prepare myself to handle the responsibility.

As a family member of someone with autism, there are certain lifestyles we can never be accustomed to, certain things that make us fairly special from others. But I couldn’t imagine life any other way. And going to this event is one of the ways I can show him my love. He couldn’t attend my graduations and events but I swear I’d attend his.​

Carlo Deogracias, Cavite Gov. Jonvic Remulla, and the author.This year, as always, we came by the thousands, today more than half of the 16,000-seating capacity of The Arena. As one of the speakers, Comelec Commissioner Grace Padaca put it, a differently-abled is never alone, the whole family goes with him. But what really hit me was to see Padaca in crutches yet she can still inspire persons with and without disabilities alike.

Having suffered polio at age three, Padaca amazed me that her disability proved no hindrance to her success as a person. It was at that moment that in my wishful thinking, I smiled as a looked at my brother.

This year’s advocacy walk to promote autism awareness not just made special by the venue but by the guests that made us feel that not only SM Cares by opening The Arena to us but also the government. Buhay Party-list Rep. Irwin Tieng, was not alone this year to make us feel special children have angels in congress championing their cause.

More than the mascots that danced before us, my brother was happy to see Senator Aquilino “Koko” Pimentel on stage. One special peculiarity that I can be proud of my brother is how he knows every Senator of this republic by name and their campaign jingle. While my brother was quick to associate Pimentel with former Senator Juan Miguel Zubiri, I would like to remember Pimentel for his efforts of reforming the 1992 Magna Carta for Disabled Persons.

For every special children and their families the only politics we know is what’s closest to home, anything and anyone helping to make this world a better place for PWD’s and special children – that’s our politics.

My brother’s 18 now, old enough to vote, but how can he? He can read, he can write, but he can’t vote just according to those he memorized from campaign jingles and slogans.

That’s why we vote in his behalf with our heart. It is our duty, as his family, to feel who truly cares for our special needs. His supposed to be one vote he can’t exercise is actually multiplied by the whole family.

​On this day, my brother and those like him and our families were honored. We felt truly special as we walked around the mall greeted and being waved at by storekeepers, staff and employees of SM Mall of Asia. So far from the contemptuous stares and demeaning gazes that meet my brother’s tantrums in public.

​This event is significant to me, because I’ll move up to college this year. This walk with my special brother, is just a step in the many walks I will have with him in this life. Every step I take forward and every climb up in my life is for my brother and as his one and only keeper. I shall walk with him and I will do my best to carry that responsibility, no matter how hard. Hand in hand with my brother, the walk will not be weary as we are each other’s angels.

(Isaiah Maru Deogracias, is a senior HS student of Statefields School in Cavite. He is a literary writer for their school paper, SSI Linkage. VERA Files is put out by veteran journalists taking a deeper look at current issues. Vera is Latin for “true.”)

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Study highlights gaps in autism diagnosis

DOCTORS lack clear and easy ways to assess if a child is on the autism spectrum, say Australian researchers who have conducted a review of the disorder.

Despite some improvements, there is still a “grey zone which could lead to over and under diagnosis”, say the researchers from the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute and the University of Melbourne.

Their overview follows the May 2013 introduction of the DSM-5 diagnosis manual for mental disorders.

The manual notably does not recognise Asperger’s syndrome as a separate condition.

But there is still no clear boundary between what behaviours are considered acceptable versus those that can be diagnosed as being on the autistic spectrum, says lead researcher Professor Katrina Williams.

“While it’s simple for paediatricians to identify children at the extreme ends of the spectrum, there is still this ambiguity for children who don’t fit exactly into the criteria.

“This can lead to differences in the way it is interpreted and therefore differences in diagnosis.

“What is lacking are clear, well defined parameters or easy ways to assess what is normal at different ages, and for different genders and cultures.

“Despite many advances, we do not know what good enough social interaction is or what good enough coping with change is and how this changes at different ages.”

The researchers say the reported prevalence of the disorder has more than doubled to one in 100 children in about 20 years, but it is unclear if this is because of greater awareness or broadened diagnosis criteria.

They say there is no known cause of the disorder, although there is evidence of a genetic link.

The study was done in collaboration with paediatricians, occupational therapists, speech pathologists, psychologists and education researchers at several universities and hospitals.

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service — if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.




Study highlights gaps in autism diagnosis

DOCTORS lack clear and easy ways to assess if a child is on the autism spectrum, say Australian researchers who have conducted a review of the disorder.

Despite some improvements, there is still a “grey zone which could lead to over and under diagnosis”, say the researchers from the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute and the University of Melbourne.

Their overview follows the May 2013 introduction of the DSM-5 diagnosis manual for mental disorders.

The manual notably does not recognise Asperger’s syndrome as a separate condition.

But there is still no clear boundary between what behaviours are considered acceptable versus those that can be diagnosed as being on the autistic spectrum, says lead researcher Professor Katrina Williams.

“While it’s simple for paediatricians to identify children at the extreme ends of the spectrum, there is still this ambiguity for children who don’t fit exactly into the criteria.

“This can lead to differences in the way it is interpreted and therefore differences in diagnosis.

“What is lacking are clear, well defined parameters or easy ways to assess what is normal at different ages, and for different genders and cultures.

“Despite many advances, we do not know what good enough social interaction is or what good enough coping with change is and how this changes at different ages.”

The researchers say the reported prevalence of the disorder has more than doubled to one in 100 children in about 20 years, but it is unclear if this is because of greater awareness or broadened diagnosis criteria.

They say there is no known cause of the disorder, although there is evidence of a genetic link.

The study was done in collaboration with paediatricians, occupational therapists, speech pathologists, psychologists and education researchers at several universities and hospitals.

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service — if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.




Study highlights gaps in autism diagnosis

DOCTORS lack clear and easy ways to assess if a child is on the autism spectrum, say Australian researchers who have conducted a review of the disorder.

Despite some improvements, there is still a “grey zone which could lead to over and under diagnosis”, say the researchers from the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute and the University of Melbourne.

Their overview follows the May 2013 introduction of the DSM-5 diagnosis manual for mental disorders.

The manual notably does not recognise Asperger’s syndrome as a separate condition.

But there is still no clear boundary between what behaviours are considered acceptable versus those that can be diagnosed as being on the autistic spectrum, says lead researcher Professor Katrina Williams.

“While it’s simple for paediatricians to identify children at the extreme ends of the spectrum, there is still this ambiguity for children who don’t fit exactly into the criteria.

“This can lead to differences in the way it is interpreted and therefore differences in diagnosis.

“What is lacking are clear, well defined parameters or easy ways to assess what is normal at different ages, and for different genders and cultures.

“Despite many advances, we do not know what good enough social interaction is or what good enough coping with change is and how this changes at different ages.”

The researchers say the reported prevalence of the disorder has more than doubled to one in 100 children in about 20 years, but it is unclear if this is because of greater awareness or broadened diagnosis criteria.

They say there is no known cause of the disorder, although there is evidence of a genetic link.

The study was done in collaboration with paediatricians, occupational therapists, speech pathologists, psychologists and education researchers at several universities and hospitals.

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service — if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.




Study highlights gaps in autism diagnosis

DOCTORS lack clear and easy ways to assess if a child is on the autism spectrum, say Australian researchers who have conducted a review of the disorder.

Despite some improvements, there is still a “grey zone which could lead to over and under diagnosis”, say the researchers from the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute and the University of Melbourne.

Their overview follows the May 2013 introduction of the DSM-5 diagnosis manual for mental disorders.

The manual notably does not recognise Asperger’s syndrome as a separate condition.

But there is still no clear boundary between what behaviours are considered acceptable versus those that can be diagnosed as being on the autistic spectrum, says lead researcher Professor Katrina Williams.

“While it’s simple for paediatricians to identify children at the extreme ends of the spectrum, there is still this ambiguity for children who don’t fit exactly into the criteria.

“This can lead to differences in the way it is interpreted and therefore differences in diagnosis.

“What is lacking are clear, well defined parameters or easy ways to assess what is normal at different ages, and for different genders and cultures.

“Despite many advances, we do not know what good enough social interaction is or what good enough coping with change is and how this changes at different ages.”

The researchers say the reported prevalence of the disorder has more than doubled to one in 100 children in about 20 years, but it is unclear if this is because of greater awareness or broadened diagnosis criteria.

They say there is no known cause of the disorder, although there is evidence of a genetic link.

The study was done in collaboration with paediatricians, occupational therapists, speech pathologists, psychologists and education researchers at several universities and hospitals.

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service — if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.




Study highlights gaps in autism diagnosis

DOCTORS lack clear and easy ways to assess if a child is on the autism spectrum, say Australian researchers who have conducted a review of the disorder.

Despite some improvements, there is still a “grey zone which could lead to over and under diagnosis”, say the researchers from the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute and the University of Melbourne.

Their overview follows the May 2013 introduction of the DSM-5 diagnosis manual for mental disorders.

The manual notably does not recognise Asperger’s syndrome as a separate condition.

But there is still no clear boundary between what behaviours are considered acceptable versus those that can be diagnosed as being on the autistic spectrum, says lead researcher Professor Katrina Williams.

“While it’s simple for paediatricians to identify children at the extreme ends of the spectrum, there is still this ambiguity for children who don’t fit exactly into the criteria.

“This can lead to differences in the way it is interpreted and therefore differences in diagnosis.

“What is lacking are clear, well defined parameters or easy ways to assess what is normal at different ages, and for different genders and cultures.

“Despite many advances, we do not know what good enough social interaction is or what good enough coping with change is and how this changes at different ages.”

The researchers say the reported prevalence of the disorder has more than doubled to one in 100 children in about 20 years, but it is unclear if this is because of greater awareness or broadened diagnosis criteria.

They say there is no known cause of the disorder, although there is evidence of a genetic link.

The study was done in collaboration with paediatricians, occupational therapists, speech pathologists, psychologists and education researchers at several universities and hospitals.

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service — if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.




Study highlights gaps in autism diagnosis

DOCTORS lack clear and easy ways to assess if a child is on the autism spectrum, say Australian researchers who have conducted a review of the disorder.

Despite some improvements, there is still a “grey zone which could lead to over and under diagnosis”, say the researchers from the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute and the University of Melbourne.

Their overview follows the May 2013 introduction of the DSM-5 diagnosis manual for mental disorders.

The manual notably does not recognise Asperger’s syndrome as a separate condition.

But there is still no clear boundary between what behaviours are considered acceptable versus those that can be diagnosed as being on the autistic spectrum, says lead researcher Professor Katrina Williams.

“While it’s simple for paediatricians to identify children at the extreme ends of the spectrum, there is still this ambiguity for children who don’t fit exactly into the criteria.

“This can lead to differences in the way it is interpreted and therefore differences in diagnosis.

“What is lacking are clear, well defined parameters or easy ways to assess what is normal at different ages, and for different genders and cultures.

“Despite many advances, we do not know what good enough social interaction is or what good enough coping with change is and how this changes at different ages.”

The researchers say the reported prevalence of the disorder has more than doubled to one in 100 children in about 20 years, but it is unclear if this is because of greater awareness or broadened diagnosis criteria.

They say there is no known cause of the disorder, although there is evidence of a genetic link.

The study was done in collaboration with paediatricians, occupational therapists, speech pathologists, psychologists and education researchers at several universities and hospitals.

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service — if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.




Study highlights gaps in autism diagnosis

DOCTORS lack clear and easy ways to assess if a child is on the autism spectrum, say Australian researchers who have conducted a review of the disorder.

Despite some improvements, there is still a “grey zone which could lead to over and under diagnosis”, say the researchers from the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute and the University of Melbourne.

Their overview follows the May 2013 introduction of the DSM-5 diagnosis manual for mental disorders.

The manual notably does not recognise Asperger’s syndrome as a separate condition.

But there is still no clear boundary between what behaviours are considered acceptable versus those that can be diagnosed as being on the autistic spectrum, says lead researcher Professor Katrina Williams.

“While it’s simple for paediatricians to identify children at the extreme ends of the spectrum, there is still this ambiguity for children who don’t fit exactly into the criteria.

“This can lead to differences in the way it is interpreted and therefore differences in diagnosis.

“What is lacking are clear, well defined parameters or easy ways to assess what is normal at different ages, and for different genders and cultures.

“Despite many advances, we do not know what good enough social interaction is or what good enough coping with change is and how this changes at different ages.”

The researchers say the reported prevalence of the disorder has more than doubled to one in 100 children in about 20 years, but it is unclear if this is because of greater awareness or broadened diagnosis criteria.

They say there is no known cause of the disorder, although there is evidence of a genetic link.

The study was done in collaboration with paediatricians, occupational therapists, speech pathologists, psychologists and education researchers at several universities and hospitals.

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service — if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.




Study highlights gaps in autism diagnosis

DOCTORS lack clear and easy ways to assess if a child is on the autism spectrum, say Australian researchers who have conducted a review of the disorder.

Despite some improvements, there is still a “grey zone which could lead to over and under diagnosis”, say the researchers from the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute and the University of Melbourne.

Their overview follows the May 2013 introduction of the DSM-5 diagnosis manual for mental disorders.

The manual notably does not recognise Asperger’s syndrome as a separate condition.

But there is still no clear boundary between what behaviours are considered acceptable versus those that can be diagnosed as being on the autistic spectrum, says lead researcher Professor Katrina Williams.

“While it’s simple for paediatricians to identify children at the extreme ends of the spectrum, there is still this ambiguity for children who don’t fit exactly into the criteria.

“This can lead to differences in the way it is interpreted and therefore differences in diagnosis.

“What is lacking are clear, well defined parameters or easy ways to assess what is normal at different ages, and for different genders and cultures.

“Despite many advances, we do not know what good enough social interaction is or what good enough coping with change is and how this changes at different ages.”

The researchers say the reported prevalence of the disorder has more than doubled to one in 100 children in about 20 years, but it is unclear if this is because of greater awareness or broadened diagnosis criteria.

They say there is no known cause of the disorder, although there is evidence of a genetic link.

The study was done in collaboration with paediatricians, occupational therapists, speech pathologists, psychologists and education researchers at several universities and hospitals.

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service — if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.